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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2014  |  Volume : 5  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 2

Factors associated with change in glycemic control in Japanese patients: Analyses of patients' misperception


1 Department of Public Health, Fukushima Medical University School of Medicine, 1 Hikariga-oka, Fukushima-shi, Fukushima 960-1295, Japan
2 Department of Public Health, Fukushima Medical University School of Medicine, 1 Hikariga-oka, Fukushima-shi, Fukushima 960-1295; Department of General Medicine, Juntendo University School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421, Japan
3 Ikenodai clinic, 3-1 Ikenodai, Koriyama-shi, Fukushima 963-8875, Japan

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This study aimed at understanding the influence of misperception of glycemic control status on changes in glycemic control after 1 year of the baseline survey among patients with poorly controlled diabetes and examining the factors associated with improved glycemic control in patients with and without misperceptions. Data on 190 Japanese patients with poorly controlled diabetes were collected from a hospital-based prospective cohort study. Misperceptions of glycemic control and other medical information was collected from a self- administered questionnaire and medical records at the baseline. Data on glycemic control was also obtained from a 1-year follow-up survey. Patients with decreased HbA1c values were defined as improved and others as unchanged or worsened. There was no significant relationship between misperceptions of glycemic control at baseline and changes in glycemic control after 1 year. 41.1% of patients with improved glycemic control and 32.0 % with unchanged or worsened glycemic control had misperceptions at the baseline (p = 0.23). The factors significantly associated with improved glycemic control were a self-perceived high score for a lifestyle regimen adherence (odds ratio (OR) = 0.15, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.04-0.66) among patients with misperceptions, as well as the presence of diabetes retinopathy (OR = 0.27, 95% CI = 0.10-0.73) among patients without misperception. Although the misperception of glycemic control did not relate to the change in glycemic control after 1 year, but the associated factors differed between the two groups. Evaluating misperceptions could therefore assist health practitioners in providing suitable diabetes care.


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