• Users Online: 176
  • Print this page
  • Email this page
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 11  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 13-24

Dietary fatty-acid profile of south Indian adults and its association with type 2 diabetes––CURES 151


1 Ph.D Scholar, University of Madras, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India; Department of Foods Nutrition and Dietetics Research, Madras Diabetes Research Foundation, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India
2 Department of Foods Nutrition and Dietetics Research, Madras Diabetes Research Foundation, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India
3 Department of Diabetology, Madras Diabetes Research Foundation & Dr. Mohan’s Diabetes Specialities Centre, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India

Correspondence Address:
Mrs. Vasudevan Sudha
Department of Foods Nutrition and Dietetics Research, Madras Diabetes Research Foundation, 6B, Conran Smith Road, Gopalapuram, Chennai 600086, Tamil Nadu.
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jod.jod_23_19

Rights and Permissions

Background: Both the quantity and the quality of fat are major determinants of chronic diseases risk. This paper looks at the fatty-acid composition of Indian foods reported in the diets of urban Asian Indians and its association with type 2 diabetes. Materials and Methods: Adults aged 20–80 years (n = 1688) were selected from the Chennai Urban Epidemiological Study. The dietary intake of the study subjects was assessed using a validated food frequency questionnaire. The fatty-acid profile of common foods reported by the population was measured from pooled food samples and substituted in nutrient database for calculation of daily foods, nutrient, and fatty-acid intake. Statistical analysis was performed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences software. Results: Of the foods tested potato chips and Indian sweet mysorepak had the highest amount of fat 46.7g and 42.2g/100g, respectively, whereas the Indian sweet sweet pongal had the lowest fat of 3.9g/100g. Palmitic acid in saturated fatty acid (SFA), oleic acid in monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA), and linoleic among poly unsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) were commonly reported fatty acids in most foods. Dietary fats provided almost 1/4th of the daily caloric intake of the subjects. Compared to national recommendations, the intake of MUFA and α linolenic acid was very low. Higher intake (>median) of calories (%E) from SFA (P = 0.007) and PUFA (P = 0.008) were associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes, whereas MUFA (P = 0.017) showed an inverse association. Conclusion: Improvement of the dietary fat profile in our population can be achieved by formulating and propagating guidelines on the selection and appropriate use of cooking oils, and increased consumption of nuts and oilseeds.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed1061    
    Printed166    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded206    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal