• Users Online: 833
  • Print this page
  • Email this page
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 11  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 39-44

Pharmacist’s contribution to medication adherence among patients with type 2 diabetes in endocrinology clinic


Department of Clinical Pharmacy and Biopharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Olabisi Onabanjo University, Ago Iwoye, Ogun State, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Winifred A Ojieabu
Department of Clinical Pharmacy and Biopharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Olabisi Onabanjo University, Ago Iwoye, Ogun State.
Nigeria
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jod.jod_16_19

Rights and Permissions

Background: Elderly people are prone to have chronic diseases requiring continuous medications. Adherence is a key factor in managing these patients. Improved adherence to medicines has a positive impact on the reduction of their hospital visits and health-related quality of life. Objective: This study investigated the potential of the pharmacists to improve medication adherence and to optimize treatment outcomes among patients with type 2 diabetes. Materials and Methods: A randomized controlled study comprising patient- and physician-focused intervention was carried out at the endocrinology clinic of Olabisi Onabanjo University Teaching Hospital in Nigeria. At baseline and six months, each group had 75 eligible patients. Patient’s self-reported adherence level to medications was assessed with modified Morisky four-item adherence scale, clinical variables were determined, and the likely reasons for nonadherence and required information were assessed. Outcome measures: Variation in adherence scores, mean clinical variables and improved patients’ knowledge base. Results: No significant differences were observed in adherence scores between control and intervention groups at baseline. High and low adherence scores in both groups were 33.3% versus 36.0% (P = 0.873) and 26.7% versus 25.3% (P = 1.000), respectively. Patients’ response at the end of intervention revealed significant score differences across board between the groups. High and low adherence scores in both groups were 34.7% versus 88.0% (P = 0.001) and 21.3% versus 2.7% (P = 0.002), respectively. Conclusion: The intervention was successful in improving adherence scores, clinical variables, patients’ knowledge base, and indication of pharmacists’ potential to bring about positive outcomes among patients with chronic diseases. There is a need for professional collaboration in disease management for the improved outcomes of patients.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed127    
    Printed11    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded32    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal